British πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ vs πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ American ENGLISH

I am keen to see what else is spoken/named different :uk: vs :us:
And maybe any comments/ideas WHY this or that is named/called different?

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Also :nerd_face:

Most people who use this phrase says :point_down:

Another day another dollar

As live in the UK, I prefer to say
β€™β€˜Another day, another shilling’’ :nerd_face: :sweat_smile:

Sort of related, people need to stop saying β€œreach out”

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I lived in the US for a while. Once when a friend there rented a new apartment and invited us to see it, I said β€˜there’s not enough room to swing a cat in here’. That took some explaining…

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Maybe I got what you want to say, but as not native :uk: English speaker, I probably would ask you to explain me it too :rofl:

What’s wrong with :point_right: β€˜β€˜reach out’’?

Here we go…

As a description of space, if you grab a cat’s tail and start circling around quickly (like an Olympic hammer-thrower), if the cat hits the walls, it’s a small space.

EDIT: This is a theoretical comment. No cats were harmed in this production.

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Yup, I’d need that one explaining too!

I’m just picturing someone trying to swing a cat in a room.

I probably fall squarely in the middle. I lived in America for much of life, and have more friends and family over there than I do here, and talk to them more frequently than I do brits too.

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I definitely understood it now :sweat_smile: :rofl:
Thanks :+1:

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Ah, so in this case it’s a literal thing not an idiom! (I hate idioms) So I was right after all! Although I was picturing the cat being held by it’s front paws. That’s how I’d swing it.

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I love this conversation :rofl:
It took only a few seconds to move from :uk: :us: Englist subject to :scream_cat: swinging across the room β€˜β€˜picture’’ :joy_cat:

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It’s an Americanism that needs to stop. Just say contact.

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I blame depeche mode

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On the cooking ingredients I had to look up arugula first time I saw it in an American recipe.

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It’s cilantro that gets me every time

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Ah yes, that one too!

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I always annoy my parents by saying oregano (:us:) instead of oregano (:uk:) :sweat_smile:

Aluminum already.

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Living in Portsmouth, I of course get told repeatedly how many of these stock British phrases come from Royal Navy origins

Square meal is one example

So I am happy/sad to report that the cat in question is not one of our small feline friends, but in fact a cat o’ nine tails

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