"Your golden ticket will be here soon"


(Andre Borie) #1

I just opened my payments tab and saw “Your golden ticket will be here soon” at the bottom - is this just a bug/oversight or will I really get one soon? The message says I should get one after a few weeks of using my account.


(Dan) #2

Mine has said this all along… although I don’t see the need anymore as I don’t think there is a big / long signup queue now… my other half signed up a few days ago and there was no one in the queue…


(Mark) #3

I have the same message. Prior to getting my current account, the message stated that golden tickets would be disabled as they were upgrading current users to current accounts.

I’d like a golden ticket, as several of my friends what to join monzo. Be interested to know what monzo’s update would be.


#4

There’s always been a plan to reintroduce after migration from the prepaid.


(Hugh Wells) #5

Golden Tickets should be back soon :slight_smile:


(Geoff Pascoe) #6

Why are they coming back? I thought the plan was to not have a queue in the long term?

Maintaining a queue past the initial transition feels like a cynical attempt to generate hype via artificial scarcity


(Graham Williamson) #7

I’d expect the golden ticket will just be the standard refer a friend but it sounds better and exciting to tell someone you’ll give them a golden ticket to get an account.

Also, it should generate the perception to the new user that Monzo is the gold standard of ‘challenger banks’ and better than the normal referral.


#8

Hopefully it comes back in a new form without the Golden Ticket thread :wink:


#9

Yep. It’s a tedious marketing tactic of startups. Be better than this.


(Andre Borie) #10

But to be honest when recommending Monzo it made the difference between “Yeah I’ll check it out” (never actually checking it out) and “Give me that golden ticket and I’ll sign up right now”. The fact that they can’t get it by themselves (without waiting a long queue) makes potential customers sign up right away (while the ticket is still valid) instead of putting it off and forgetting about it the next day.


(Ray Singh) #11

Hey @hughwells, When exactly are we going to see those tickets. There are at least 20 people in my company begging to sign up! :smile:


#12

Only because they artificially introduced scarcity. Scarcity means value; value means demand.


(Andre Borie) #13

Not sure how “artificial” that was - prepaid did get way more attention than originally planned. But in any case, it works just fine to bring more people onboard so why nix it?


#14

When I got to the front of the pre-paid queue it took only 10 minutes for verification checks, and only 3 days for my card to arrive.

It was great to know how close I was to reaching the point that someone would start working on the application, and to know once it was started it would be quick.

It is possible that the demand is still greater than the infrastructure to keep the wait this short if all verification checks were submitted at the same time, at which point it wouldn’t feel that great to see some people seemingly get approved really quickly, while you might take a while longer, as your submission was further behind in the ‘queue’ of pending applications.

If this is the case then they are just making that ‘queue’ public, so you know how far along you are in the process.


(Rika Raybould) #15

While this played into the marketing side, the waiting list serves a very important logistical purpose in allowing us to smooth the demand on the card operations team and support. :scroll: If we get a sudden spike, we can see the waiting list grow and have a chance to try and scale things up before we increase the rate of queue unlocks so that support queues or card delivery times don’t also shoot up. :smiley:


(MikeF) #16

Exactly what @RichardR said.

I love the fact (not) that everyone immediately assumes a negative purpose in having a queue when there are perfectly valid reasons for one.

What’s wrong with managing new account processing capacity via a queue? Why does it have to be marketing hype nonsense?


(Geoff Pascoe) #17

Sure, initially that makes sense. If they need a queue to manage signups long term, though, there’s something wrong.

I think @naji summed it up fairly well here:


(Alex Sherwood) #18

Right, once Monzo’s growth is as predictable as one of the legacy bank’s - in other words, once they look a lot more like a blue chip stock & a lot less like an early stage tech company - we can expect them to be able to forecast their growth accurately :+1:


(Andre Borie) #19

Actually I don’t see what’s wrong with having a queue; if the queue is empty customers would get their accounts straight away, but if there’s a sudden surge of new signups they will know straight away how long to wait instead of not having a queue and being promised a card fast while in reality the Monzo office is overwhelmed and can no longer meet the demand, resulting in disappointment and angry support queries.


(Peter Roberts) #20

Yup, that’s my thinking. Afterall there is always a queue - its just a case of whether Monzo make it public - IMO a good thing :smile: