Did I give enough evidence to Monzo about Scam case?

On Friday I was tricked by the HMRC tax fraud scam and lost £7,000. I contacted Monzo straight away and have gone through all the Monzo procedures. What I am concerned about is if I gave enough evidence to Monzo for them to refund my money. I was able to send them screenshots of the call log, a Whatsapp message from the scammers and answers to 7 questions about the scam from Monzo. But is this enough? Did I answer the questions in enough detail (one or two sentences per question)? And is it too late to provide further evidence? Such as I hadn’t mentioned that they were also pretending to be the Ministry of Justice, using their phone number…

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

You’ll have to just wait and find out from their investigations to find out if they had enough information from you. :slight_smile: We’re only customers on here so can’t really help with it.

This sounds bad, but, how did you manage to fall for it considering all of the warnings in the app? Is there any information you can give about it so that other people can not fall for the same scam?

I’d probably pop Monzo a message to see if you can add anything to your case. Worst they can say is no.

Good luck with it.

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Fingers crossed you get your money back.

From the other threads where this has happened, Monzo will come back to you if they want more info on something. So try not to worry yourself, if you’ve given all that you can remember for now then sit tight and see what Monzo say.

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What has the ministry of justice got to do with HMRC?

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Nothing. But they throw these things out to scare you.

Same as they say police have a warrant out for your arrest for owing taxes. Despite the fact police don’t get involved when you just owe some tax.

Also we wouldn’t just call you to say “yeah we need to arrest you”. We’d just… come do it.

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Whenever I read these topics I always wonder how scammers find people who have thousands of pounds saved up. I assume it’s just luck.

If they asked me for £7k I’d just say good luck with that, I’ve got 50p to my name so come and arrest me.

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Can we help at all? :flushed:

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I probably get 10-15 calls per day with people saying this is attempted, and that’s just one person on one 12 hour shift in one city.

99% haven’t had any money transferred (they recognise it’s a scam and call police) but there are some that do.

I suspect they just throw a ton of (metaphorical) faeces and see what sticks :man_shrugging:t2:

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Well they originally asked me for only £700, but each arrest warrant and paper work added up to £7000

To answer the OPs question…

If you think you could have given them more evidence and you have it, then you absolutely should give it to them. If you don’t have anymore to give then there’s nothing more you can do than wait for the outcome.

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They make you lookup the number of some high court or some legal authority on the legitimate government website, and then call back while spoofing that number to make it look like they’re really there. As we can see here it’s an effective tactic. :man_facepalming:t2:

Thank you for this, I will send them a message.

Sorry, i think i managed to delete my original reply whilst trying to edit it, here it is again:

Well, the main reason I fell for it is because I had just done my first ever tax return this year myself, so I believed them when they said there was a few errors. They then passed me to someone from the Ministry of Justice, using their phone number (Which I checked when I received a call from them ‘02033343555’) They then told me, because of this unpaid tax, there was an arrest warrant for tax fraud against me and to remove it I needed to pay. I asked the person for some identification, and they told me there badge number and name which sounded legitimate, followed by them shouting at me not to waste time as I could be arrested at any minute. I was then told as soon as I pay and the arrest warrant is removed, the money pay would be refunded instantly. They then said the ministry of justice declined the removal of the first offence as there were 5 other arrest warrants which needed to be paid before I could clear my name and get my money back. So I paid :man_facepalming:t2:. They then said I needed to pay for the paperwork to be sent to the Ministry of Justice, the police and myself. This is when I thought something was up and I asked for them to give me back my money and I was promised if I paid for the paperwork I would receive all of it back. I did not receive any money back. :man_facepalming:t2:

The reason I still paid the money, even though there were warnings, was A: I was panicking and just wanted the arrest warrant to be removed and B: The scammer said that this was just an error with my bank and that it usually happens to people when paying HMRC. It also didn’t help that the same warning popped up only a few days ago when I paid a friend.

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Just curious how old are you?

There’s no harm in adding additional context if you think it is useful.

The best advice I can say, is make to write up a clear concise timeline of events; covering who contacted you, how they persuaded you, and why you thought they were legitimate.

Key focus should be to demonstrate why it felt legit.

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@hknapp How did it go - Were you able to get a full or part refund at all?

Received a full refund on the 14th day :slightly_smiling_face:

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So happy for you! My younger brother has had this happen and has put forward a case so it gives us more hope for a full refund - Also thanks for sharing your experience :slight_smile:

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More the better in my opinion