Extinction Rebellion Protests

A little tongue in cheek, but it gave us a laugh.

How on Earth do they think this will have any effect when thousands of regular folk do that to the roads of almost every tourist destination in the UK most summer weekends?

:joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy:

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I live in the East End and traffic was backed up for miles today! I was cycling, so I got to enjoy passing the stranded motorists. I only found out why when I read the news, otherwise I’d have cycled over Tower Bridge and given ER some friendly words of support.

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I live very close to, and sometimes for work have to venture into the Peak District, so this is just normal to me throughout the summer :joy:

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They will be back in uni soon.

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Didn’t take long for the dismissive comment. Go back to Uni, get a job, get a wash, middle class gap year, vegan loonies, etc. Truly big brain commentary.

Whilst ER may impact on day-to-day life, their aims are noble, i.e. “using nonviolent civil disobedience to compel government action to avoid tipping points in the climate system, biodiversity loss, and the risk of social and ecological collapse”.

Whilst I may be long gone before the planet becomes truly doomed, we are already feeling the effects now and I would like the human race to continue even if I’m pushing up daisies. A little annoyance is a small price to pay.

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I don’t really mind them protesting by being disruptive. London’s roads are closed off regularly for events in any case, so a few extra days in the summer doesn’t make a huge difference in the greater scheme of things, and it ensures that they get a lot of media exposure.

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With the current state of the environment as predicted by scientists, sitting on the streets until somebody takes notice and does something seems like a rational reaction to me. Far more rational than sitting at home not really doing anything anyway.

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It is a fair point though - the people in the photo are all of uni age. As for the rest… your words, not mine.

Guildhall was covered in red paint on Friday by Extinction Rebellion protesters, who said they aimed to “highlight the blood-soaked profiteering of our financial system”.

That isn’t ‘civil disobedience’ - that is deliberatly breaking the law.

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What do you think civil disobedience means :sweat_smile:. If they were obeying the laws that wouldn’t really be disobedience would it?

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It is perfectly possible to cause a nuisance and/or protest without vandalising property. I’m alarmed that anyone would think otherwise. If I came and smashed your windows, that would just be shrugged off as ‘civil disobedience’ I guess? Such a weird mindset that people think it is ok (as long as it is not their own property being damaged!).

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Exactly the same distracting arguments were made against the civil rights movement and the stonewall protests.

Come gather ’round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You’ll be drenched to the bone
If your time to you is worth savin’
Then you better start swimmin’ or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin’

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Climate change will do a heck of a lot more damage than a few broken windows.

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I guess smashing windows is ok then.

I’m yet to hear any reasonable argument from anyone why damaging property is actually helping anything. If anyone damaged your property you would be up in arms. The double standards are amazing.

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Your words, not mine.

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I don’t get it at all

Need to reduce our carbon footprint but it’s fine to unnecessarily have to make and transport new windows to replace those smashed

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The struggle for justice is an ongoing and necessary pursuit that should prevail over laws and institutions.

— The Satanic Temple

You seldom make progress or be heard without breaking a few laws.

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Because there’s no point in making any really.

We are headed to potential famine, war, disease and food shortages worldwide. I couldn’t give a flying **** if a few windows get broken really, it’s just not relevant given the scale of the issues at stake.

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I think that’s where I stand on it too.

I don’t condone some of the actions, but in the grand scheme of things…

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Except inconveniencing the everyday people and small businesses won’t change a single thing – those who could and should change things won’t care at all. Especially not as the biggest culprits are on the other half of the continent/on other continents anyway

Didn’t they also try to shut down a tube line once? How is that going to help? It just puts people off supporting them and their cause. They don’t make me think of the polar bears, just of what a massive pain in the **** they (the protesters, not the polar bears) are

Making a massive nuisance of yourself is all good and well, but they need to consider whether it resonates with the people, and I’d put money on the majority of the population taking a dislike to this approach

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But isn’t that opinion:

‘I couldn’t give a flying **** if a few windows get broken really, it’s just not relevant given the scale of the issues at stake.’

Could also be be taken in the same context with recycling? What I do to help recycling isn’t relevant given the scale of people who need to also do it. It’s passing the buck.

Personally, I think Extinct Rebellion has noble aims but acting in a terrible way. Blocking traffic so people sit waiting with their engines running. Not very environmentally friendly. Protesting on the London Docklands electric railway etc.

I believe in the right to protest, but I don’t agree on pushing views on law abiding people using violence or stopping law abiding people getting on with their lives without disruption.

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