Monzo Tone of Voice Updates - Discussion

2 Likes

What a weird article passing it off as “news” that Tone of Voice has been there since the beginning of time, and as far as I can see no recent amendments.

:man_shrugging:

1 Like

I think it is a good idea to not use phrases such as ‘elephant in the room’ - as the article states, it might not be understood by people who are not familiar with the term.

But ‘blacklist’ and ‘whitelist’ I don’t see a problem with using (depending on the context), as far as I am aware historically it has nothing to do with race.

Nor addressing a mixed sex group of people as ‘guys’. Has anyone ever been offended by that (serious question)?

4 Likes

Yep. I generally refuse to reply to anything addressed to guys

4 Likes

I do dislike ‘guys’ whatever happened to ladies and gentlemen … I am the older generation though so am probably wrong lol

2 Likes

Yes, I would agree with that. Even ‘Ladies and Gents’ would be better than ‘guys’, but I don’t see why it is offensive. I believe over the passing decades it has become more and more gender neutral IMO.

1 Like

It has… my female colleagues use it to refer to each other all the time.
Meanings of words change over time.

3 Likes

I use guys as a gender neutral term, and I find it quite commonly used like that too.

9 Likes

‘You guys’ fixes a bug in the English language in that it doesn’t have an official second-person plural pronoun like ‘ustedes’ in Spanish or ‘你们’ in Chinese. (Unless you live somewhere where you can say y’all)

4 Likes

I use ‘folks’ as a reasonable workaround :slight_smile:

2 Likes

You is the official second-person plural pronoun. Thou or thee is the official second-person singular pronoun. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

If we could all just speak proper English, this wouldn’t be a problem.[/sarcasm]

3 Likes

I’ll just stick with ‘Oi you lot’ :raised_hands:

4 Likes

Anyone else think they should just ask you how you want to be addressed etc.

1 Like

To me that means parents.

So me being me I just did a diff and yep its 99% the same content thats existed for years.

It’s a lazy Twitter inspired “News” article.

3 Likes

So either Monzo are lying, or they have just not updated the external version on the website yet. My money is on the latter :slight_smile:

I must admit I find this “tone of voice” stuff a bit controlling and off-putting. Who decrees that “elephant in the room” and “blacklist” are not to be used? Am I missing the point or are normal phrases in use across all businesses now being policed? Fine it it’s just guidance but it feels like there are new invisible tripwires being set up for people to fall over.

3 Likes

Rightly or wrongly, it keeps people in employment across the country.

4 Likes

What no? It has been updated I’m just the saying tone of voice article has been almost identical since the end of 2017.

They’ve just added a few lines to it. These to be precise:

Try to keep your sentences under 20 words

Why? Because we’re all human and we’re all busy. Shorter sentences are easier for people to scan and quickly get the information they need. Plus, they’re more accessible for people who struggle with reading or have a cognitive disability, like dyslexia.
Studies show that 11-word sentences are considered easy to read, and those of 21 words are fairly difficult. Research also shows that when your average sentence length is 14 words, people understand over 90% of it. But at 43 words, people understand under 10% :exploding_head:

Default to what you’d say out loud

The trick isn’t to sit there counting every word you write. We vary the length of our sentences when we talk. So you’ll see where you’d naturally pause or take a breath when you read it out loud. Reflecting that in our writing makes us sound more human, and helps with rhythm too.

and

We think about all the different meanings or associations words might have when we use them. In our technical work we use ‘allowlist’ and ‘blocklist’ instead of ‘whitelist’ and ‘blacklist.’ That’s because of the origin of these terms, with white being seen as ‘good’ and black being seen as ‘bad.’

We explain ideas as clearly as we can

Colloquial expressions (like ‘ain’t’ and ‘gonna’) and idioms (like ‘the elephant in the room’) might be harder for people from different cultures, or people with English as a second language, to understand.
So if there’s a clearer way to explain an idea, that’s what we should use. And if someone uses a word or phrase you’re not familiar with, it’s best to ask them to explain! You’ll be helping them learn to be more inclusive in their communication, and helping any other people reading or listening who might also be struggling to understand.

Everything else is untouched. The stuff about “folks/guys” was there from the start.

I feel like I’m dobbing in the person who’s meant to keep these things regularly updated.

Sorry @phildawson my bad. I thought it was untouched publicly facing.

1 Like