Cycling to Work - Tips

Where I work, there are showers and a changing room which I used to use. But one day I realised that if I cycled slower so I didn’t sweat, my door-to-desk was faster because I didn’t have to waste time showering and changing. So I dress for work and cycle at a relaxed pace. I’m a big believer in wearing ‘normal’ clothes and hopping on and off my bike.

As for tyres, I like a ‘touring’ tyre – 1.5" wide with some grip, but no knobbly bits. This is pretty fast but can also deal with the weather, rough roads, grit, gravel paths, etc. Something like the Schwalbe Marathon.

If there’s a bike you like, but don’t think the tyres are what you want (too thick/thin; too much/little tread), talk to the Evans staff. They will likely be willing to replace the tyres for you and add the cost onto your Cycle to Work voucher, so it gets paid for all as one. (Note you can include clothing, helmets, locks, etc. on the voucher too.) Buying through the Cycle to Work scheme is definitely the way to go – as well as spreading out the payments, it saves a lot of money.

You can measure this in decades if you replace parts when they break or wear out. Unless the frame gets damaged, anything else can be replaced (and the frame should last well over 50 years). I bought my bike second-hand, but over many years have had to replace most of the parts at one time or another. But it keeps going, it’s a workhorse. It really depends what you want out of a bike. Some people want something a bit fancier or to be able to take advantage of new gear as it comes along. If that’s important, at a certain point it makes more economic sense to sell your bike and buy a new one.

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Just the traffic into Manchester city centre is enough motivation to cycle.

I got this a couple weeks ago: https://www.e-bikesdirect.co.uk/brands/basis/basis-osprey-folding-low-step-electric-bike-14ah-battery

And while I’m not using it for commuting I’ve done around 50 miles so far (and most of the in the last week!)

I’ve started from doing not a lot of exercise but I really enjoy this, hills don’t stop me and I can keep going for a lot of time!

If you wanna use your phone for any metrics/mounting it, I’ve found quadlock to be worth its price.

Perhaps consider joining cycling uk as gives you 3rd party insurance and a legal team ,especially considering what happened recently

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Get yourself round to a cycle shop and have a look for yourself see what you’d be comfortable with, having a good old sit on a bike or 5 will help you decide what you like

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For us non–clairvoyants, what happened recently?

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Would guess he’s referring to this

Check the full details of this, including any final payments and exactly what those would be. I’ve just found that these aren’t as transparent or as good as they first seem. You can still save money but they don’t clearly state what you’ll actually pay at the end.

[j06] j06 Jamie :rainbow_flag: Crowdfunding Investor
13 September

For us non–clairvoyants, what happened recently?


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In Reply To

[pdj1899] pdj1899 paul jones
12 September
Perhaps consider joining cycling uk as gives you 3rd party insurance and a legal team ,especially considering what happened recently

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I think from what I understand, I may be asked to pay for 25% of the bike’s worth at the end of the 12 months - as well as naturally paying the certificate off over the 12 months (minus tax and NI payments) through salary sacrifice.

Either way I think i’ll go through cycle scheme as it gives me the most amount off

CycleScheme (which it sounds like your work don’t use) take ownership of the bike after the first year and ‘rent’ it to you for £0/year for two years. After that (ie bike is 3 years old), its value has dropped significantly and you buy it for a nominal sum. It might be your work can do something like this.