Banking, and life, way back when

When I opened my first current account in the late 70s most banks didn’t have cash machines and telephone banking was unheard of. The only way to check your balance was to either go into the branch to ask them, or wait till your statement arrived.

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I’m only 33 years young. HSBC solo, come at me. :joy:

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Mine was an A4 sheet of paper and a pen to show In, Out, and Balance.

Ground breaking :rofl::rofl::rofl:

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I remember the days when I worked for a bank and they needed advisors to help on the balance enquiry line. 10 hours of overtime at double time - easiest money I’d ever earned. :joy:

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I can’t really remember what I did, but I know it was essential to fill in your cheque stubs, otherwise you wouldn’t have a clue where your money was going.

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My first bank account was with Natwest. The cashcard was made of tin and allowed you to draw £10 only. It got swallowed up and mailed back to you about a week or so later. I recall you could use it 20 times as little notches appeared on it following which you were sent a new one. £10 was a lot of money in those days. 20 Cigarettes were about 30p for B&H and Players No 6 were about 25p. A pint of Watneys Red was about 18p a pint. Petrol was well below £1 a gallon (4.5 litres).

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You used to have to wait 20 mins for a song to download too.

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Tin? The first metal card, and we are still lusting after metal cards today.

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Moved these to a new topic to avoid going off track :innocent:

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Recording the top 40 by cassette tap ready to play on the school bus the following week was me.

Those stop, rewind, edit and record skills were boss :raised_hands:t3::joy:

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When i first started copying cassette tapes on a double deck recorder, I thought it would also record voices in the room, so I had everyone be silent if they were around the device while it was copying :see_no_evil:

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:joy: same.

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I remember my first account with Halifax I had this passport like book that the banker made a record of everything in and out of my account so I could keep track of it. That’s about all I remember pre online banking etc. I’m not that old though so that’s probably not far from what we have ended up with today :smiley:

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My first bank account was a Woolworths Building Society account. An old style passbook with hand written entries.

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I think you mean the Woolwich Building Society, not Woolworths. :slightly_smiling_face:

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I do. :joy:

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My first experience of saving, as a child, was with National Savings stamps with my 10p pocket money :smile:

Then I progressed to a National Savings account and passbook

Screenshot 2022-08-27 at 11.00.35

And then, when I started work, I opened my first current account, a National Westminster Bank account!! Wooooo! :rofl:

Two years later, I had access, excuse the pun, to my first credit card :grin:

One current account. One credit card. Those were the days :rofl:

Now have close to 20 current accounts and six credit cards (atm) :man_facepalming:

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I don’t feel old but here I am retired and receiving pensions. Anyway, first savings account was with Leeds Permanent Building Society. I went into town on a Saturday with my dad and paid in some of my pocket money. They recorded it by hand in a passbook.

First bank account was with Midland Bank (acquired by HSBC eventually) as a student. Cheque book and debit card (I think). Paper statements in the post once a month that looked like they’d been printed on a dot matrix printer.

First credit card was Access. Wasn’t long before I went over the limit but haven’t done since.

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My first bank account:

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There was me getting excited at the thought of Woolworths having a Building Society! I would have so been on eBay looking for some old banking memorabilia! :joy: :nerd_face:

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