The Vegan Thread!


#101

I think people forget about this sometimes. People go vegan for lots of reasons and if it works well for them that’s great, more options are always better so it’s good to see the shops having more vegan options now.

But it doesn’t work for everyone. I don’t mean because people just don’t like foods, but having actual intolerances to food. While I’ve been no where near as bad as Mikhaila with intolerances to food, there are huge swaths of plant based food I just can’t eat, it makes me unwell. Meat is the only food I know I can eat for sure and not get sick, along with that there are a few plant based food types I can eat, but not many. I tried going vegan for a while (and did it) but intimately couldn’t keep up eating enough with what I had to cut out and I wasn’t any better for it.

I do my best to get food from good sources but won’t sacrifice my health. It’s a reality of the world some people find difficult to think about I think so ignore it. (Meat eaters who don’t know where there food is from) I wonder if it’s the same for vegans? I know there’s lots of problems around sustainable farming, palm oil is a big one last I read.


(Dawid) #102

Ahh palm oil, yes it is the same in some cases. For some reason when people ask me about my veganism they suddenly think I’m judging them, which I am not at all.

It’s totally understandable to have food intolerance that make you very limited in your plant-based option. Believe me, my friends are still making big eyes when they realise I still don’t eat corn or peas. And that’s fine.

One thing that veganism made me do is to go out there and explore the world of foods and start cooking. Making my own meals is like exploratory trip to that world. Suddenly I fell in love with lentils, chickpeas, various vegetable soups, amaranth or quinoa salads. And also avocado - before being a vegetarian I have never had it :smiley: There was just no need.

But even though some people are very strict vegans it doesn’t mean that it’s what we want the world to do. Not yet. Everything is a progress. For some people fake meat options are great transitional foods. I eat them because I like soy nuggets so much, not because I crave chicken. I actually can’t eat soy-based meat substitutes if they smell or taste like meat (yup I developed a natural aversion).

I take my veganism step by step too. Last time I had to buy pair of shoes in Peru but since I’m 6"2’ it wasn’t easy. I opted out to go to Converse, a company I wouldn’t have used before because it was too expensive but now I put my veganism above my need to save a bit of money. They’re not completely vegan (I believe their glue still has animal products) but they were the closest I could find, and in my size.

The point is even if you reduce your meat intake you are already helping the world, and the animals. Of course for us it’s easy to say that we would like it to stop 100% and we will be hoping for that for as long as we live but realistically we take even the tiniest victory.

I met this lady on a plane from Colombia to US. She was moved to the seat next to me because her seat belt didn’t work. We talked for 3 hours and at one point we started talking about veganism. She said she wanted to at least try it but her grown-up kids own a very meat-heavy restaurant. I actually became her “vegan couch” so that she can try some vegan recipes at home. But she wanted to at least limit the intake.

Anyway, apologies for a long post, but you’re right not to sacrifice your health. At the same you are already aware of all those things vegan, which is great first step. Even if you choose to limit your palm oil intake - you’re already helping what veganism stands for - equality for all animals, and we’re grateful for that!


(Liam) #103

:heart:️ Excellent write up, @Dawid


(Andy Hughes) #104

I’m not sure if I would ever ‘go vegan’ because of the usual reasonings, I think there are definitely two sides to the arguments that are commonly made. I also love meat. HOWEVER, now that there are more and more vegan options and they are real options, not just something vegetable based being made to look/smell/taste like processed meat, I think it gets easier and easier to cut down on meat. To me this is a win win as I can still enjoy meat as I have always done, but I can afford to source meat that has been farmed ethically, had a decent life and you know where it has come from.
I totally don’t agree with intensively farmed animals and actually feel weird going to a supermarket and buying meat from some unknown farm somewhere that’s just been exploited in every way possible, chopped up and vacuum packed. I know in the end all of these animals are destined for the table, but they should at the very least be cared for and given a good quality of life and decent welfare.

I know this is not in the slightest bit being a vegan, but for me at least, I think this is an acceptable solution.


#105

I don’t think we should see it as binary, tbh. Being thoughtful about where our food comes from and making informed choices is more important, I think. And if that leads you to being vegan then all power to you.

Agree 100%. I’ll frequently have a dish that happens to be vegetarian or vegan - not because it’s got that label, but because it’s just delicious food.


(Simon B) #106

Hellmans have a vegan mayo coming out!! :raised_hands:t3:

https://veganuary.com/blog/hellmanns-to-launch-vegan-mayo-in-uk/


#107

Has anyone here tried a “meat” product made from Heme yet? I don’t even know if it’s a thing yet but I read about it years ago…

I eat meat. I love bacon. I love cheese. I’m probably veggie about 4/5 days a week. And I’ll try vegan recipes and restaurants when I see them because they’re usually quite creative.

I’ve never had sietan* wings…where can I buy them to try?


#108

Is that the thing that’s being developed that “bleeds” and is meant to replicate meat…?


(Simon B) #109

Yep, I’ve had the Impossible Burger whilst in the US, as well it’s main competitor, Beyond Meat which I think is about to launch here soon.

The Impossible Burger, I believe is made using Heme. And it’s disturbingly close to meat. It’s been a while since I ate meat, but i honestly believe most people wouldn’t be able to tell the difference… Which I believe is the point.

In terms of taste, I prefer Beyond Meat. But if the aim is to make the product that most resembles meat but isn’t, then the Impossible Burger is the one for you, unquestionably.

I believe the Temple of Seitan in London does the wings. Not had the chance to go yet myself but they are very popular from what I’ve heard.


#110

If you don’t mind me asking, what’s it like as a vegan to eat something that’s (nearly?) imperceptible to meat? Any physical / psychological reaction?


(Simon B) #111

It was weird and quite unsettling. I couldn’t focus at all on actually enjoying the food for the most part because my taste buds and brain were just so confused by the whole thing. I mean, I’ve had other products that have been prepared and cooked to resemble meat on many occasions and never had any issue but this one takes it to a whole new level. Still, I did enjoy the food once the shock wore off and if I eat it a second time I’ll be better placed to judge it on it’s own merits.


#112

I just googled heme…New York has loads of places…I’m going there in March for Paddies Day so I will indulge! Guinness is also Vegan friendly now I believe… :slight_smile:


#113

It makes me doubt and scared im eating meat!!


#114

New York is also home to The Cinnamon Snail (video). Never been but the pictures/videos of their food always makes my mouth water.


#115

Wow, I’ll save that now.

I go NY quite a bit but as I get older it’s gone from walking round all the time with a hangover to exploring and now dining… That one looks great though.


(If there's the wrong end of a stick, you'll find me holding it.) #116

I’m not a vegan myself, but I came across someone which might interest vegan Londoners


(Peter Shillito) #117

Popped into Iceland the other day and they’d just added a whole bunch of vegan products as part of their “No Bull” (and now “No Chick” and “No Porkies”) range. Some photos here https://twitter.com/theshillito/status/1038748638430863360

I was quite fond of their No Bull burgers which launched a while ago, so I’m pleased they added an entire chest freezer full of these products (never seen a veggie/vegan paella before!!) so I’ve got plenty of experimenting to do!

As far as naming these products after the meat products they aim to replace/represent, a potential goal would be to make telling the difference between the meat and the veggie/vegan equivalent to be minimal. Also, not many people are raised as veggie/vegan (and I would question parents who think pushing that on their children is wise when they can’t make the decision for themselves, especially since I understand that meat is needed for good brain development when growing) so recognising products that are similar to what you’re replacing is a good idea for those wanting to become veggie/vegan.

Also, all the vegans I know refer to vegan cheese as “gary” now, and I can confirm both Sainsburys and now Ocado too return their vegan cheese offerings when searching for “gary”. :laughing:


(Simon B) #118

I went to Sainsburys yesterday and was surprised to pick a lovely vegan pizza, a vegan katsu curry made with sweet potato, and a vegan soya keema ready meal, plus some shredded vegan cheese.

I used to work next to this particular Sainsburys and they never used to have many vegan products there at all!


(Peter Shillito) #119

That’s great! I should visit a Sainsburys, but I have to go to Nantwich to go to one, so it’s a bit out of the way…

It’s funny that Nando’s in Crewe keeps running out of its (admittedly amazing) veggie meals, Crewe Iceland starts stocking loads more products, and then they’re building a second KFC near my house :thinking:


#120

Btw if any of you haven’t seen Simon Amstell: Carnage - definitely worth a watch, it’s not about anything to convert, it’s set in future when the next generations are fully vegan, but people from now still arnt!

“It’s 2067, the UK is vegan, but older generations are suffering the guilt of their carnivorous past. Simon Amstell asks us to forgive them for the horrors of what they swallowed.”

Btw it’s a bit tongue in cheek and intentionally ott incase anyone thinks this is what vegans want in the future …