Accounting for cash


(Simon Rose) #1

Whilst I acknowledge that cash is rapidly becoming obsolete, you do occasionally need to carry the blasted stuff - particularly for small rural shops. Whilst on holiday I needed to pay for a fishing day permit by cash which taken from a withdrawal of a larger amount earlier in the week.
Often cash ‘disappears’ through small trivial amounts, but when it’s for a known expenditure it might be useful to account for this within the transaction that shows on the statement - e.g. £50 withdrawn as cash, £15 tagged/categorised as hobbies and the remainder on sweets and beer (general).

That way, when looking at overall expenditure per catagory you’d get a more accurate result.

Does that make sense?


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(Liam) #2

That makes perfect sense!

Especially with the new spending interface, Monzo seems keen to become a bone fide budgeting application for those without complex situations. Accounting for cash would make sense in this context.


(Nathan) #3

I had also raised this same thing up a few weeks back ago on the forum. Seems to be quite a popular thought and hopefully they can do it with similar logic to the new split payments logic


(Jamie 🏳️‍🌈) #4

I disagree with your base hypothesis.


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(Vladislav Kozub) #5

I would rather disagree with your statement, it is very subjective and not supported by facts.

A report from Moneymailme found that two thirds (64%) of 18-25 year olds now use a mobile wallet, and 62% feel frustrated if they are forced to make purchases with cash.

“This generation of young people has grown up with mobile technology and for many of them using cash seems like a very dated concept, especially with the range of alternatives available to them,” said Moneymailme CEO Mihai Ivascu.

Generation Z (those aged 18-25) overwhelmingly prefer to use digital services such as Apple Pay, Google Wallet and Moneymailme to conduct their transactions.

Whilst fiat money such as cash paper, are unlikely to disappear per se, it certainly is

When the generation of baby boomers and X will pass away, cash will almost be unspoken off, and cards are also likely to become obsolete.

But I do understand the point you are coming from. After all, no one thought there will be anything faster than trains in the 19th century, no one expected film to disappear in 1960s, and no one believed that computers will be easily accessible to the public in 1970s.


(Simon Rose) #6

Ok, so maybe my opening statement was a little too broad for everyone. I’ll refine it. In my world, the need for paper notes or coins is rapidly becoming less and less. In the past few months, the only things I’ve needed traditional/physical cash for is to pay my barber and buy a fishing permit at a local rural Welsh shop. For everything else I use Applepay or contactless payments. Even the smallest transaction I can think of, car parking, can be paid for by electronic means in most places I visit.

Monzo themselves have almost set a precedent with this as they actively discourage you from withdrawing cash and suggest contactless payments instead.

But my reason for raising the ticket was IF we do withdraw cash, let’s have a way to catagorise or itemise it better.

Is that clearer?