Revolut chat

Tbh I pay £3 a month more on my SIM only plan for O2 and get unlimited data in a ton of non-EU countries. Haven’t worried about turning my phone on in ages. So this doesn’t seem much value in and of itself.

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Interesting direction. 3gb of data doesn’t seem like a lot though, enough to get by but I tend to rinse it while travelling. With cheap local esims easy to buy on airlo I feel like you’d need to both a) travel a lot and b) be generally conservative with data when you travel to make this worth it. That said, it’s always good to see more competition in the mobile data space.

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Competition is good, yes

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Revolut Becomes First UK Financial Institution to Launch eSIM UPDATE - ISPreview UK

UPDATE 14th Feb 2024 @ 7:02am

Some of Revolut’s customers (credits to Daniel and David) have kindly forwarded us information on the plans and prices from their app. The “Local” plans start with the “free” 100MB tier (valid for 7 days) and come in at 1GB for £4 (valid for 7 days), then 3GB for £8, 5GB for £12, 10GB for £18 and 20GB for £29. All except the free and 1GB tiers are 30-day plans.

The “Global” plans, which will work across 108 countries, follow a similar mould and will give you 1GB for £22, 3GB for £29, 5GB for £47 and 10GB for £85. You can also get country-specific prices. But it’s worth noting that there are other travel eSIM providers that, for specific countries, may be cheaper than this. Prices and experiences do vary, but it’s worth checking out Nomad, Airalo and Holafly etc.

The word “rip-off” comes to mind

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Wait, so you have to have the ultra-expensive Ultra plan then pony up £22 for one gig? :scream:

I’ll stick to O2

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I guess it’s for the people who have “fuck you” levels of money, rather than the :musical_note: Common people :musical_note:

There are. Airolo is $9 for one gig on their global sim which covers more countries, although local sims are always much cheaper than this so I’ve never bought it.

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Those types tend to turn on roaming data and just pay the huge charges :smiley:

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And probably don’t use Revolut.

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Especially Scottish politicians, when the taxpayer is paying.

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That’s a fair bit random thing to post.

It isn’t that random. They were talking about roaming charges, and a Scottish politician just resigned for expecting taxpayers to pay their massive roaming charge.

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He resigned because it turned out the usage wasn’t work related but I think the bigger scandal is that it was an official Scottish parliament phone plan (as opposed to a person plan that he expensed) and they were paying these excessive roaming rates, they should be negotiating better when using the taxpayers money.

A few video meetings would have racked up a similar bill.

I think this is one of the reasons why they switched to Vodafone, but Matheson failed to do so

Timeline: The iPad data roaming row that brought down Michael Matheson | STV News

Why were there such extreme additional roaming charges?

Matheson failed to update his old EE SIM card to Vodafone.

STV News revealed that the SNP minister was asked to change to Holyrood’s new provider several times up to a year before his holiday.

As well as not putting his new Vodafone SIM in, he also failed to tell the Scottish Parliament he was going abroad – which they required MSPs to do so that the appropriate roaming package can be applied.

This means that Matheson’s usage would have gone to EE’s default tariff for being in Morocco.

As the device was issued by the Scottish Parliament, officials at Holyrood challenged the fee but EE declined to waive it.

And I don’t know what The National says, but I tend to avoid it. One of the most obviously biased papers about with some very questionable articles from time to time.

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As above, the reasons it was expensive were a) he was on an old plan and b) he forgot to tell parliament about his trip so they didn’t apply a roaming package.

That said, I don’t really think it’s a scandal at all. Apart from the obvious scandal that a mobile company somewhere is raking in 11k for data that probably cost them a couple of quid to provide

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Apart from all the lies and cover-up he attempted, and the fact he repeatedly went against what the Scottish government was telling him, and then the fact the First Minister stood by him despite all of that.

If he just accepted what he did wrong in the first place and didn’t try to push it onto the tax payer, it wouldn’t have been such as issue. The cover-up is what made it all a scandal.

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Mountain out of a molehill. He pays the bill and just move on. But because it’s politics people pretend it’s a scandal.

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Except he lied to try to avoid doing this.

We need to hold politicians to account. Him ignoring what the Scottish government was telling him was bad enough, but then trying to cover up what he did isn’t what we should have from those in power.

If I ignored my bosses at work, cost them thousands of pounds, and then tried to cover it up, I wouldn’t be able to just “move on”, yet people like you expect those in power to be held to a lower standard than this. People like you not holding those in power to account is how we’ve ended up with politicians breaking rules all over the place.

Anyway, I think this probably belongs in another thread as it has shifted away from Revolut a bit too much now.

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“People like you” calm yourself and stop being so dramatic for a change.

He made a mistake and offered to pay for it. Months later “people like you” are still crying about it

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1000007321

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