Monzo Decision Making

I don’t accept that, as what you quoted was not related to the point I replied about.

It is from the very same post. It very much relates.

Edit: I’ll leave it to the post creator to decide though.

When you see material from other banks it’s often promotional. If you see a gay person or a trans person or a woman or a person of colour or a disabled person it’s often because they’ve chosen to show you that person to go “look how diverse we are, give us your money”.

Monzo is diverse behind the scenes. They’re not doing it for show, they actually seem to be trying their best.

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I agree, and didn’t say otherwise. I can see this conversation is pointless so I will bow out.

Well maybe my view is clouded because i actually work in a financial company in belfast that has a “diversity network” that is actually run really well and has monthly talks and events that fundraise for LGBTQ causes. :man_shrugging:

Whilst not belonging to LGBTQ+, we are greatly encouraged as “Allys” To do whatever we can to create a warm an welcoming environment for everyone. Be that walk in pride with our colleagues, attend the monthly talks/fundraisers or like you say wear out lanyards.

I think us in northern ireland were even more so encouraged over the last year or so due to the lack of same sex marriage legislation

While I applaud diversity, it should NEVER be forced upon people.
Everyone should be entitled to their own views, no matter what they are.

I recall a bus driver being disciplined for refusing to drive a vehicle which was promoting “gay pride”
In my opinion, the driver was quite within their rights to do so.

As long as you are not offensive to such people, your views should be respected as much as theirs.

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Also like, if someone doesn’t enthusiastically support LGBTQ+ inclusivity then, the community doesn’t exactly want them there either.

Any company forcing inclusion isn’t actually inclusive, they’re doing it for show, to tick boxes.

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Can i just point out you have both used the word forced which has massively miss-trued my point and is not anywhere close to the term i used :joy:

I said greatly encouraged, nothings forced what so ever more i meant that in terms of any support thats needed is given to the network.

I wasn’t criticising your company specifically (we don’t even know what your company is). I was speaking about companies in general, some of which do treat inclusivity as a box ticking exercise. I think @Ivan1954 was doing the same.

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It was reinforced heavily in the early days.

From workplace diversity to critiques of common banking practices to helping refugees open accounts to paying attention to the mental wellbeing of their staff (and their customers) to helping gambling self-exclusion to having readable Ts&Cs to their tone of voice to attempting to have a fairer overdraft pricing structure.

Transparency was also heavily emphasised for a long time, which can be surprising looking at the company now.

And of course, their June 2016 post titled What Makes a Bank Ethical?:

We started Mondo because we believe there should be an alternative to the banking of the past. We are focussing on solving customers’ problems, rather than selling financial products, to create what we hope will be the best current account in the world.

Unfortunetly the Monzo Ethics page linked from it is laughably lacking in information.

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I agree, he’s perfectly entitled to refuse to drive that bus. His employer is also perfectly entitled to discipline/sack him for refusing to carry out a lawful request under his contract of employment with them.

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Even if the said request goes against their (personal/cultural/religious) views?? :thinking:

Homophobia isn’t a personal, cultural, or religious viewpoint. Same as transphobia, racism, sexism or anything else protected under the equality act.

Now I’m not saying a bus driver should be sacked because he doesn’t want to drive in a pride parade - but if you’re that homophobic that you refuse then you have bigger issues to deal with.

We’re also getting massively off on a tangent now

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As ever the law can dictate how people act. It cannot even get close to dictating what people think. As a result, just about anything can be a personal, cultural or religious viewpoint.

Yes. You’re all off-topic. Naughty.

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Would anyone think it OK for someone to refuse to drive a bus with a black person depicted on the side? Or a woman? Or someone in a wheelchair?

No?

It’s the same thing. And it’s bigotry, as well as being utterly ridiculous.

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That’s an entirely different narrative than @Ivan1954’s original point, and a bad analogy, in my opinion. What you’re describing is discrimination, opposing pride is not. I fundamentally believe in freedom of expression, including the freedom to offend. I despise pride for many reasons, non of which are homophobic, as such, it should not be forced upon anyone.

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Nothing of the sort, as @N26throwaway said, what you are describing is discrimination.

To give another example, would you expect a staunch Labour supporter to actively promote the Conservatives, or say a vegan to promote a steakhouse???

This seems to be waaaay off topic :eyes:

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No one has ever been killed for being Labour, or a vegan.

I’m going to stop replying to this topic as it’s not even vaguely related to the original post or in any way constructive.

Jo Cox MP?

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